Selected Writings on Political Philosophy

by Roderick T. Long

Ancient China:

Austro-Libertarian Themes in Early Confucianism

Ancient Greece:

Civil Society in Ancient Greece: The Case of Athens

The Athenian Constitution: Government by Jury and Referendum

Thrasymachus and the Relational Conception of Authority

Socrates and Early Socratic Philosophers of Law (with R. F. Stalley)

[Stalley wrote the sections on Socrates (except for the paragraph
beginning “A somewhat different solution” on p. 43), while I
wrote the sections on Xenophon, the Cynics, and the Cyrenaics.]


The Construction of Happiness

Temptation and Easy Virtue

Why Character Traits Are Not Dispositions

Aristotle’s Conception of Freedom

Aristotle’s Egalitarian Utopia: The Polis kat’ eukhēn

Hellenistic Philosophers of Law

[See also “The Classical Roots of Radical Individualism,”
“Forced to Rule: Atlas Shrugged As a Response to Plato’s Republic,“
Reason and Value: Aristotle versus Rand, “Realism and Abstraction
in Economics: Aristotle and Mises vs. Friedman,” “The Value in Friendship,”
and “Why Does Justice Have Good Consequences?” below.]


18th Century:

No Matter, No Master: Godwin’s Humean Anarchism

19th Century:

Commentary on the Bastiat-Proudhon Debate

Inside and Outside Spooner’s Natural Law Jurisprudence

Herbert Spencer, Gustave de Molinari, and the Evanescence of War

From Ancient Greece Through the 19th and 20th Centuries:

The Classical Roots of Radical Individualism

20th and 21st Centuries:

Forced to Rule: Atlas Shrugged As a Response to Plato’s Republic

Realism and Abstraction in Economics: Aristotle and Mises vs. Friedman

The Racist Syndrome: Sartre, Rand, and the Will to Concreteness

Ayn Rand and Indian Philosophy

Reason and Value: Aristotle versus Rand

The Value in Friendship

Rothbard’s Left and Right: 40 Years Later

Anscombe for Austrians: Praxeology, War, Democracy, and the State

Review of Leland Yeager’s Ethics as Social Science

Why Does Justice Have Good Consequences?

Equality: The Unknown Ideal

Why Libertarians Believe There Is Only One Right

Abortion, Abandonment, and Positive Rights: The Limits of Compulsory Altruism

The Irrelevance of Responsibility

Immanent Liberalism: The Politics of Mutual Consent

Toward a Libertarian Theory of Class, Part 1
Toward a Libertarian Theory of Class, Part 2

On Making Small Contributions to Evil

Stakeholder Theory for Libertarians

Rule-following, Praxeology, and Anarchy

Market Anarchism as Constitutionalism

Chomsky’s Augustinian Anarchism

The Justice and Prudence of War: Toward A Libertarian Analysis

A Florentine in Baghdad: Codevilla on the War on Terror

Land-Locked: A Critique of Carson on Property Rights

Libertarian Feminism: Can This Marriage Be Saved? (with Charles Johnson)

Corporations versus the Market

Regulation and the Financial Crisis